Category Archives: Cultural Intelligence

Cultural Intelligence – Knowledge

Following from the Drive component of CQ I would like to reflect on the Knowledge (Cognitive) component.  CQ knowledge refers to your understanding of cultural similarities and differences; it includes knowledge of the values, norms and practices in different cultures settings.  This knowledge can be acquired through educational and personal experiences; and encompasses the economic, political, legal institutions and social customs to name just a few.

CQ

 

Why do we need CQ Knowledge?

  • To allow us to have greater appreciation of the systems that shape and cause specific patterns of social behaviours and interaction within a culture
  • Improve interpersonal interactions with people from culturally diverse backgrounds, i.e. communication, relationships and trust
  • Improve your leadership and management skills to ensure that they reflect the cultural setting that you are working, leading and managing in and across
  • To navigate effectively through ambiguity and conflict in culturally diverse settings
  • To have the awareness and skills to instantaneously adjust your behaviours while interacting with people from unfamiliar cultures.

While you cannot be an expert on every culture, you can understand the core cultural differences and their impact on everyday business.  CQ knowledge is not fixed, rather it is a mental habit that can be altered and expanded.  I often find that one of the best methods of seeking new knowledge is from gaining a basic understanding of key past events and basic country history.  This can provide a deeper insight into the general values, behaviours and attitudes that are displayed by individual mindsets and the wider community.

Strategies for Improving CQ Knowledge:

  • Choose a culture that interests you.  Read a novel, magazine or local newspaper from an overseas site; or an author native to that country
  • Listen to overseas radio programs
  • Visit culturally significant places to learn more about them i.e. a mosque, synagogue or sporting venue
  • Visit art galleries or museums that display stories and artworks from other countries. These help you to gain a deeper understanding of why and how they were created and their cultural significance
  • Continuously observe body language, facial expressions, gestures when you are interacting with people of different cultural backgrounds
  • Don’t be afraid to ask questions, people love to talk about their culture.  This can also be a great way to build relationships.

Reflections:

  • Consider some of your cultural assumptions and expectations
  • How do they impact your views and experiences when you are either traveling or interacting with people of other cultures?
  • How do you gain your CQ knowledge?
  • What are your preferred mediums to attain CQ knowledge? For example is it through reading, travelling, convsersations etc?

You may like to listen to my ‘CQ Knowledge’ Podcast in ‘CQ for Global Leaders’ by clicking here.

Cultural Intelligence – Drive

I would like to delve further into the four components of  Cultural Intelligence (CQ) over the next few blog posts.  This post will focus on Drive.

Drive is one of the key components to CQ.  It is your interest, motivation and confidence to adapt to a multicultural situation. It consists of intrinsic and extrinsic interests and the drive to learn and understand different cultures, their norms and behaviours.

The intrinsic and extrinsic motivators are culturally determined.  Extrinsic rewards are usually financial, such as salaries, bonuses and benefits.  Intrinsic rewards are psychological rewards that individuals reap from engaging in meaningful work with a healthy balance of choice, competency, challenge and success.

CQ

As an individual you need to establish and maintain your own CQ drive and as a leader you also need to instill and support the motivation of your employees.  Remember that your intrinsic and extrinsic motivators may be vastly different to those of your peers and employees so it is important to have a range of strategies in place.

Strategies for Improving CQ Drive for self:

  • Take some unconscious bias tests, seek feedback
  • Be prepared to make mistakes, learn from them and then move on
  • Identify your passions, what they are and why do you care about them?
  • Reflect on what guides and influences your behaviours and attitudes toward culturally diverse groups
  • Welcome opportunities to mentor others as a ‘cultural broker.’

Strategies for Improving CQ Drive for others:

  • Understand your own motivations, it will assist you when you are influencing and motivating others
  • Provide an exciting and clear vision of what can be accomplished i.e. share success stories and celebrate milestones
  • Ensure that the relevance between task and purpose is transparent.  Help people to make clear connections between the vision and the work
  • Reinforce confidence in the self-management of individuals.  Intrinsic motivation improves when people feel trusted and their expertise and skills are recognised and appreciated
  • Share customer feedback and interactions with individuals and the wider team.  Not only does this promote purpose and goals, it also reinforces the successes and highlights areas for improvement.

Reflections:

  • Take a moment to consider what you find most challenging when you are in culturally diverse settings
  • Consider some of your CQ drivers and those that you have observed in others
  • How do you think improving your CQ drive could assist both yours and your teams overall level of CQ?
You may like to listen to my ‘CQ Drive’ Podcast in ‘CQ for Global Leaders‘ by clicking here.

Smashing through the bamboo ceiling

Bamboo ceiling

Procurious, is a unique online business networking site specifically designed for procurement and supply chain professionals.

Dr Verghese was interviewed in ‘Smashing through the bamboo ceiling’ to discuss the processes and barriers that serve to exclude Asians or people of Asian descent from executive positions in Western-run organisations.

A provocative article that features some pragmatic strategies toward shattering the bamboo ceiling.

 

 

People and Projects Interview

 

People and projects

People and Projects Podcast with Andy Kaufman

Recently Tom was interviewed by Andy Kaufman to discuss the importance of cultural intelligence.  Tom and Andy discuss various scenarios from project managing global virtual teams in the U.S. and Germany to planning a visit to China and strategies for facilitating successful virtual meetings.

Click here to Listen

Bridging the cultural gap

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Watch Tom speaking at the Australian Human Resource Institute Conference 2015 ‘Bridging the cultural gap’.

How does Behaviour Inform our Perceptions?

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One of the challenges of working across borders is that certain behaviours and styles of communication and body language may not have the same meaning.

For example in countries such as Malaysia the etiquette for shaking hands is a soft hand to demonstrate respect; conversely in Australia a soft handshake can be interpreted as a lack of respect, sign of disinterest, weakness and insincerity. Our mental antenna goes up and we start to look for evidence to support these initial impressions. Are we going to find evidence to support our initial impressions? Most likely yes! The person more than likely will do or say something that will support these impressions. Our biases come to the surface. For example, at the conclusion of a meeting you may be thinking to yourself – “That soft handshake reinforced my initial perceptions. I knew I couldn’t trust him/her.” All of these interpretations can be made from a simple handshake.

I advise clients to not squeeze the hand. Often their response is “but you can tell so much about a person by their handshake.” Think about this for a moment. Is this a universal truth or is it culturally bound? When we interpret behaviours we tend to compare them based on our own cultural practices because we are familiar with them.

There are so many subtle cultural nuances. I had a coaching client from Nigeria who would ask me questions such as, how long do you look at someone in the eye, when does a look become a stare? Have you ever thought about this? My guess is probably no. Conversely, if you are in cultural environments where eye contact should be avoided, how would you know how much is too much?

In countries such as Australia if we go to a bar with friends and colleagues the norm is an unspoken assumption and practice of taking turns to buy the rounds of drinks. We don’t discuss this. It doesn’t matter if you are a guest or not, generally it is an equitable practice where payment of the drinks is shared equally. So imagine this scenario that was shared by one of my clients. He had an Indian manager visiting the Australian office. My client invited him out for a drink after work. My client brought all of the rounds of drinks and was annoyed and irritated that it wasn’t reciprocated. My clients’ internal dialogue was telling him ‘this guy is tight, not generous and has no sense of sharing’.   The following day at work he requested a report that wasn’t delivered on time. The thought processes of my client were, not only is he tight with his money, he is also unprofessional and unreliable. This example demonstrates how one misinformed behaviour can lead to inaccurate perceptions and interpretations. The perception of the Indian manager would have been ‘I am the guest, you are the host therefore you pay. I won’t offend you by offering to buy a drink, and when you come to India I will take you out and I will pay because you are the guest and I am the host.’

It is useful to have a dialogue. It can be uncomfortable raising certain conversation topics but communication and cultural awareness and knowledge can be improved immensely when people can pluck up the courage to raise the uncomfortable, awkward conversations.

The questions that we need to be thinking about are:

  • How can I develop flexibility and cultural agility?
  • How can I learn the important behaviours and values of the cultures that I am working across?
  • How can I understand what are the things in my culture that are important; and what impact do they have when I am dealing with people of different cultures?

 

Preparing for Globalisation

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Breaking into new markets, navigating new local landscapes and understanding the behaviour and needs of global consumers are a few daunting issues requiring close consideration when preparing for global growth.

I have witnessed organisations expanding into overseas markets for reasons that in hindsight were poorly planned and forecasted; fewer competitors, lower costs and growing local demand were at the forefront; along with time constraints of hitting the market before opportunities are lost. Expanding into new markets can be exciting, financially rewarding, while encouraging innovation, creativity, adaptability and responsiveness. It also requires careful consideration, local knowledge and understanding and in-depth research. Some critical questions to consider are:

  • How will you differentiate your service/product to appeal to local consumers?
  • How/what has the local market/landscape hindered local companies providing this service/product previously?
  • Local consumers often expect company interactions to have a local, relevant ‘feel’ – how can this be achieved?
  • How will you understand specific regions, markets and customers?
  • How will you gain the trust of local customers?
  • How will you incorporate local ideas/skills into your strategies?
  • How will you incorporate cultural intelligence into your organisational goals and visions?
  • How will you know how successful your organisation is performing in terms of interactions with customers and stakeholders?
  • How will you build local supplier relationships?

Successful companies with long-term strategies, that develop and apply carefully considered new approaches to their business conduct, products and services have a greater likelihood of enduring global business success. While tailored strategies to each country’s context can ensure capitalisation on the strengths of particular locations, following are some high level areas for refection.

  • Different cultures have different expectations, needs, perceptions of quality etc. The challenge is often how far to go when modifying products/services for different markets, without compromising the reputation, value or quality of your product/service that has been the backbone of your success.  How do you achieve this without risking your global brand reputation?
  • Finding the balance between being adaptable and flexible in terms of business models, marketing, product design etc when entering new markets is challenging. Understand what the local market and consumer motivators are, their values and the different cultural key drivers and preferences.